Mik Everett's Blog

Mik Everett is a 22-year-old writer living in Wichita, Kansas with her daughter. She is a staff editor at Kleft Jaw Press and co-founder of Syntactics Literary Development Group.

I can sympathize with Ken Kesey who once said that he stopped writing because he was tired of being a seismograph—an instrument that measures rumblings from a great distance. He said he wanted to be a lightning rod.

yeahwriters:

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Dear all,

A Nameless Zine is an up and coming lit/ art online mag. We have released the first issue with some great selection of poetry and prose!
We are now in search of contributors for Issue #2 as well as permanent contributors. These positions will be limited so drop a line!

We are in search of high- quality experimental poetry and prose. We prefer that those who submit are below the age of 25 because our target group is young people, but it is not necessary!

So, if you have any great stories or lines you want to share with the world do not hesitate to contact us at the link below: http://anamelesszine.tumblr.com/submit

Our zine is always open for submission!

Thank you sooo much in advance and hope you contact us!
Much love

Do all writers, programs, and books fit somewhere on a continuum between MFA or NYC? The answer, as Harbach knows, is no. American fiction is one thing, not two. Dividing it into two cultures is as strange and artificial, in its way, as dividing the ocean on a map. Yet the distinctions are natural and in some cases essential, as long as we don’t forget that we made up these categories in the first place. The true, important achievement of MFA vs NYC is advancing an ongoing conversation about fiction begun by The Program Era. How does art flourish in an environment of institutional creativity? How do writers make money and produce literature at the same time?

thetalltwig:

So as many of you may have heard, April is National Poetry Month! As a poet, this is like a holiday that lasts all month long. I would love to see this writing community grow, so the lovely Van + I are collaborating to host a National Poetry Month Challenge.
We are asking other writers to participate in tagging their poems with #30days30poems + creating something new every day in April. I can’t wait to get this started! Let’s start a collective of wonderful, innovative poetry.
Please share this message by liking + reblogging! Let’s encourage each other in our craft. I love you all!

Yup. Doing this.

thetalltwig:

So as many of you may have heard, April is National Poetry Month! As a poet, this is like a holiday that lasts all month long. I would love to see this writing community grow, so the lovely Van + I are collaborating to host a National Poetry Month Challenge.

We are asking other writers to participate in tagging their poems with #30days30poems + creating something new every day in April. I can’t wait to get this started! Let’s start a collective of wonderful, innovative poetry.

Please share this message by liking + reblogging! Let’s encourage each other in our craft. I love you all!

Yup. Doing this.

(via serenepristine)

backfromhell:

Turkey spotted during an existential crisis outside Raven Used Books in Harvard Sq. today

backfromhell:

Turkey spotted during an existential crisis outside Raven Used Books in Harvard Sq. today

(via bannedlibrary)

tepidmess asked: My main character is asexual but shes only just realizing it, and in my book the actual word "asexual" is never said. Do i hav to say the word to properly represent the diversity, or simply imply it?

fixyourwritinghabits:

I think this really depends on whether or not your character has a lot of knowledge on LGBTQIA politics, or their age and general knowledge about the world. If they do, then it would be more than reasonable for them to come to the conclusion and for you to refer to the identity in question. If they don’t - say, for example, they came from a really heteronormative background where only lesbians and gay men have ever been mentioned and only in passing - then it doesn’t make much sense for them to know that there’s a word for what they’re feeling.

Other people are free to disagree, but this is mostly coming from my own personal experience as a queer person. I didn’t know trans men existed until I was in my late teens because I come from a socio-economic background where these things weren’t commonly discussed or even entertained, but I always was one. I’ve always felt dysphoria with my gender, but at the time I didn’t know there was a word for it. And I think that’s an experience applicable to the less known/discussed acronyms. So if this is a story focusing on your character’s perspective and that’s the case, then I think that would be keeping in character with them. There are ways to show your character is asexual, even if they themselves don’t know the term.

However, if that’s not the case, I think it’s perfectly fine for your character to realise they’re asexual and say so.

(For the record this is AJ, in the interest of nobody getting confused between the three voices behind the curtain and accidentally misgendering my fellow mods.)

Great answer that applies to representation of quite a few identities in all kinds of lit.